Guides, Manuals, Tools

  • Handbook for Legislation on Violence against WomenHandbook for Legislation on Violence against Women (DESA-DAW 2009). This handbook outlines the international and regional legal and policy frameworks, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), which mandate States to enact and implement comprehensive and effective laws to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for legislation on violence against women, including recommendations on the content of legislation, accompanied by explanatory commentaries and good practice examples. Finally, it provides a checklist of considerations to be kept in mind when drafting legislation. The checklist highlights the importance of identifying a clear legislative goal; undertaking comprehensive and inclusive consultation with all relevant stakeholders, and in particular survivors; and adopting an evidence-based approach to legislative drafting.
  • CEDAW and the Reporting Process to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women: A Guide for UNICEF Field StaffCEDAW and the Reporting Process to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women: A Guide for UNICEF Field Staff (UNICEF 2009). This guide is a resource for UNICEF field staff and partners to enable them to engage actively in the CEDAW process and to use CEDAW and its Optional Protocol as tools for policy development and planning, and for promoting and advocating for women’s and children’s rights.
  • Gender Equality at the Heart of Decent WorkGender Equality at the Heart of Decent Work (ILO campaign, 2008–2009). In June 2008 the International Labour Organization (ILO) launched a year-long, global, public awareness-raising campaign, “Gender equality at the heart of decent work.” This campaign, coinciding with the 90th anniversary of the ILO, was held in the lead-up to the June 2009 International Labour Conference’s general discussion on the same topic. The campaign was built around twelve Decent Work themes, one each month highlighting how women and men may be affected differently in their access to rights, employment, social protection and social dialogue. For each of the campaign themes, an information brief was produced, accompanied by a poster and postcard, as well as a video news release and dedicated webpage. The September 2008 brief, “Remove the Obstacles: On the right track to equality,” jointly developed by the Bureau for Gender Equality (GENDER) and the International Labour Standards Department (NORMES), focuses specifically on the institutional link between ILO standards and CEDAW. Read it in English, French and Spanish.
  • Making the MDGs Work for All: Gender-Responsive Rights-Based Approaches to the MDGsMaking the MDGs Work for All: Gender-Responsive Rights-Based Approaches to the MDGs (UNIFEM 2008). This is a tool for policy makers and development practitioners who are seeking practical guidance for incorporating gender into the MDGs. It calls for a gender-responsive and rights-based approach to implementing, monitoring and reporting on the MDGs. It argues that the foundations for such an approach have already been laid in CEDAW and the Beijing Plan for Action, which complement and reinforce the MDG framework. The publication aims to assist countries by suggesting a process for developing a gender-responsive rights-based national MDG reporting framework, and providing a sourcebook of issues to consider, possible strategies, and suggested long-term and intermediate targets and indicators.
  • CEDAW Briefing KitCEDAW Briefing Kit (UNIFEM 2008). This is a basic introduction to the Convention. It explains the key principles of the Convention in simple terms, and offers a quick glance at the articles of the Convention and a description of the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendations. It also provides brief information on the CEDAW reporting process, including what State reporting entails and the role NGOs can play in the reporting process.
  • 25 Years of Work of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (DESA-DAW 2007). This CD-ROM provides easy access to 25 years of work of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in monitoring the implementation of CEDAW in States parties between 1983 and 2007. Following an introduction and overview of the Committee’s work, the CD-ROM provides the full text of all concluding comments issued by the Committee since its first session, organized alphabetically by country and in chronological order. It also contains the text of the Convention and the Optional Protocol, as well as the 25 general recommendations issued on articles of the Convention or cross-cutting themes, and its 1998 statement on reservations.
  • Women’s Health and Human Rights: Monitoring the Implementation of CEDAWWomen’s Health and Human Rights: Monitoring the Implementation of CEDAW (WHO 2007). This guide explains how human rights related to health are enshrined in CEDAW, governmental obligations to implement those rights, and monitoring of those obligations by the CEDAW Committee. It concludes with suggestions for maximizing WHO’s use of the CEDAW monitoring process. The guide provides information on how WHO can assist countries in complying with their treaty obligations for women’s rights, including the elimination of discrimination against women in the area of health care.
  • CEDAW and the Human Rights-Based Approach to ProgrammingCEDAW and the Human Rights-Based Approach to Programming (UNIFEM 2007). This publication is a practical guide to the human rights-based approach (HRBA) to programming for UNIFEM staff as well as partners, with a particular focus on CEDAW. It highlights concrete implications for programming of applying the HRBA and provides detailed background information on CEDAW and other human rights treaties.
  • Passport to EqualityPassport to Equality (UNESCO, UNAIDS, UNIFEM 2006). The Passport to Equality is a pocket-sized publication that presents, explains and reproduces the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in the form of a personal passport. The purpose of the Passport is to make women and men all over the world aware of the existence of the Convention.
  • CEDAW and Security Council Resolution 1325: A Quick GuideCEDAW and Security Council Resolution 1325: A Quick Guide (UNIFEM 2006). This guide provides a basic introduction to CEDAW and UN Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security, and reviews their commonalities, synergies, and potential strategic uses, particularly in the context of conflict and post-conflict reconstruction.
  • Advancing Gender Equality – Using CEDAW and UN Security Council Resolution 1325Advancing Gender Equality – Using CEDAW and UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (UNIFEM 2006). This training module is a tool to build the capacity and awareness of gender equality advocates in government and civil society in the Southern Caucasus to advocate for and support the implementation of CEDAW and UN Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security.
  • Women’s Rights in the Course of the Land Reform in the Republic of TajikistanWomen’s Rights in the Course of the Land Reform in the Republic of Tajikistan (UNIFEM 2005). This manual presents fundamental information on the land reform process in the Republic of Tajikistan. The manual is of practical interest for employees of executive bodies, managers of rural businesses and organizations, leaders of dekhan farms, local government, everyone involved in the process of land reform and able to ensure women’s land rights in Tajikistan.
  • Claim and Celebrate Women Migrants’ Human Rights through CEDAWClaim and Celebrate Women Migrants’ Human Rights through CEDAW (UNIFEM 2005). This publication takes women’s migration for work as an illustration to demonstrate how the methodological framework of CEDAW can be used effectively to address the long-term and immediate concerns of women migrants at all stages of the migration process, even in the absence from the Convention of a specific Article on migration.
  • CEDAW Made Easy: Question and Answer BookletCEDAW Made Easy: Question and Answer Booklet (UNIFEM 2004). This booklet is designed to provide women’s human rights advocates, government officials, students, teachers, practitioners, and the general public with a snapshot view of CEDAW. It aims to raise awareness of the rights to which women are entitled under the Convention. It can be used to bring about concrete improvements in the lives of Caribbean women.
  • CEDAW: Restoring Rights to WomenCEDAW: Restoring Rights to Women (Partners for Law in Development [New Delhi] in cooperation with UNIFEM and Zonta International 2004). This publication is intended as a reference and resource for those seeking a better understanding of CEDAW. It looks at the basic rights, principles and concepts that are the foundation of the Convention, examines its scope and coverage, and offers an in-depth discussion of how it can be used as a framework to promote gender equality and protect the human rights of women. The publication aims not only to provide information, but also to encourage dynamic inquiry and application of CEDAW.
  • The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Reporting ProcedureThe Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Reporting Procedure (UNIFEM 2004). UNIFEM prepared this tool on the new procedures for reporting on CEDAW, in light of the increasing number of Pacific Island Countries and Territories involved with the preparation of reports on the implementation of the Convention to the CEDAW Committee. It was prepared to assist State Parties, non-governmental organizations, and development partners to fulfil their reporting obligations.
  • Handbook for Parliamentarians – The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and its Optional ProtocolHandbook for Parliamentarians – The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and its Optional Protocol (DESA-DAW and IPU 2003). This handbook provides a comprehensive presentation of CEDAW and its Optional Protocol for parliamentarians. The handbook presents the background to and content of the Convention and the Optional Protocol, and describes the role of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. It discusses implementation of the Convention, and provides examples of good practices. It provides guidance on what parliamentarians can do to ensure effective implementation of the Convention and encourage use of the Optional Protocol.
  • Human Rights Protections Applicable to Women Migrant Workers: A UNIFEM Briefing PaperHuman Rights Protections Applicable to Women Migrant Workers: A UNIFEM Briefing Paper (UNIFEM 2003). This briefing paper provides some tools for human rights advocates working to advance the rights of women migrant workers. It examines a set of concerns facing women migrant workers using the five most relevant major human rights conventions, including CEDAW.
  • Trafficking in Persons: A Gender and Rights Perspective: Briefing KitTrafficking in Persons: A Gender and Rights Perspective: Briefing Kit (UNIFEM 2002). This briefing kit is an invitation to all practitioners addressing the issue of trafficking in persons to revisit and rethink their efforts from a gender and rights perspective. It consists of a number of informative fact sheets on the topic, its magnitude, and best practices to address the problem.
  • Empowering Women Migrant Workers in Asia: A Briefing KitEmpowering Women Migrant Workers in Asia: A Briefing Kit (UNIFEM 2002). This briefing kit highlights the experience of struggle, resilience and creative practice of overseas women migrant workers and their support groups. It enhances our understanding of why and how prevention of discrimination and abuse of these women should be addressed as issues of promoting gender equality, upholding basic human rights, and promoting sustainable development and principles of good governance.